Tennis

Tennis Racquet Picturejpg

Origin Of Tennis

The game that most people call tennis is the direct descendant of what is now known as real tennis or royal tennis (which continues to be played today as a separate sport with more complex rules). Most of the rules of the game commonly known as tennis derive from real or royal tennis. It is reasonable to see both sports as variations of the same game. maxresdefault

Most historians believe that tennis originated in the monastic cloisters in northern France in the 12th century, but the ball was then struck with the palm of the hand hence the name jeu de paume (“game of the palm”). It was not until the 16th century that rackets came into use, and the game began to be called “tennis.” It was popular in England and France and Henry VIII of England was a big fan of the game, now referred to as real tennis.

Court tennis is also known as royal tennis. It originated in France during the Middle Ages and became a favorite of British royalty, including Henry VIII. The progression from court tennis, which used an unresilient sheepskin ball filled with sawdust, sand, or wool, to lawn tennis depended upon invention of a ball that would bounce.

History of Tennis

Tennis has a long history, but the birth of the game played today is thought to have taken place in England.

11th century beginnings
The earliest recognizable relative to tennis, as we know it, was “jeu de paume”, played in 11th century France. Played in a monastery courtyard, the game used the walls and sloping roofs as part of the court and the palm of the hand to hit the ball.

Tennis overtakes croquet
By the late 19th century, the popularity of lawn tennis had overtaken croquet in England. For this reason, the All England Croquet Club embraced the sport and designated certain croquet lawns to be used for tennis. It was this natural supply of venues combined with the already existing framework for a racquet game that resulted in the birth of the modern game in England.

An international sport
In 1913, lawn tennis was becoming increasingly popular worldwide. Therefore it seemed natural that the existing National Tennis Associations should join forces to ensure the game was uniformly structured. An international conference was held between 12 nations in Paris and the International Lawn Tennis Federation (ILTF) was created.

Professional dilemma
Tennis has a long Olympic history but withdrew from the program after 1924. It did not return as a medal sport until 1988. Professionals are now welcome to compete, and the Olympic competition includes men’s and women’s singles and men’s and women’s doubles.

Equipment

Balls
They must be yellow or white, with a diameter between 6.54 and 7.3cm and a weight between 56.0 and 59,49g.

Court
A smooth, level playing area, covered with grass, clay or an artificial surface.

Net
The net is attached between two poles and divides with an equal distance the two sides of the court. The Height of the net is in its centre of 0,914m and on its two sides of 1,07m.
Racket
A light bat with a frame in wood, steel or graphite with a network of cord, catgut or nylon, stretched in an essentially elliptical frame.

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